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Old 10-23-2013, 07:25 PM
Nyles Nyles is offline
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Default Bought some new guns

Haven't posted any new guns in awhile, so what the hell.

My most recent addition was a Smith & Wesson 1899 .38 Hand Ejector, which was S&Ws first truly modern swing-out cylinder revolver (the 1896 .32 HE had a number of features held-over from earlier guns) and the very first .38 Special to hit the market. It's pretty similar to the later 1905 .38 Military & Police that became the Model 10, except for the unsupported ejector rod, straight contour barrel and rounded rubber grips. It also has the tiniest sights I've ever seen on a service-type revolver! I still have pretty good eyesight and they're almost unusable except in perfect lighting conditions. This one has a 6 1/2" barrel and not alot of finish left, but it's in great mechanical condition.



I also picked up a 1942 Bulgarian contract Star Model B in 9mm Luger. The Bulgarians were allied with Germany in WW2 and participated in the occupation of Yugoslavia, but not in the invasion of Russia. That didn't stop the Russians from invading THEM in 1944, and this is a typical Russian captured gun with mismatched parts and a not espescially careful rebluing. The Bulgarians actually fought on the Allied side after 1944, so this piece would have seen service on both sides of WW2.

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Old 10-23-2013, 07:41 PM
Nyles Nyles is offline
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I also picked up a Winchester-Hotchkiss 1883 saddle ring carbine from work. This was the first bolt-action rifle made by Winchester, a 5 shot .45-70 with a tube mag in the butt loaded through the open action. They were initially developped for the US military, who tested the 1878 and 1879 models in rifle and carbine configuration, and then the 1883 in rifle only. This is one of very, very few 1884 carbines made for commercial sale. It's actually a surprisingly functional gun, feeds beautifully once you get used to loading the magazine, and pretty well to boot!



Also picked up a 1918 Remington M1917 Enfield from a friend of mine for a very good price - this one was later sold to Canada during WW2 and used for training and defence at home. The red stripe around the forend was added at this time to warn you not to load .303 ammo into it, as it's pretty much identical to the .303 P14 rifle. This one is a tack driver - last time I went shooting I was banging the 300 yard gong with every shot.

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Old 10-23-2013, 07:42 PM
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funkychinaman funkychinaman is offline
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I didn't know S&W had unsupported ejector rods. If I ever get around to that revolver guide I've been putting off, I'll have to remember that.
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Old 10-23-2013, 07:54 PM
Nyles Nyles is offline
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Only the 1899 .38, 1896 .32 and 1st model .22 Ladysmith (1902) did. The 1902 .38, 1903 .32 and 2nd model Ladysmith (1906) all went to supported rods, so they only did for 10 years across 3 models, none of which are commonly seen today.
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Old 10-24-2013, 02:05 PM
Jcordell Jcordell is offline
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Some great pieces there Nyles. As always I'm very impressed with some of the items that you find.I also have a S&W Model of 1899 M&P with the 4" barrel. Mine was manufactured in 1902 and is chambered in .38 Spl. As you can see somewhere in the 109 years before I purchased it (2011) the original ejector rod end cap went missing and was replaced. I've toyed with the idea of replacing it, but so far I haven't.



Last edited by Jcordell; 10-30-2013 at 12:32 PM.
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Old 10-29-2013, 06:02 PM
Nyles Nyles is offline
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Thanks! That's a nice 1899 you have yourself, definitely in better shape than mine. I do prefer the 6 1/2" barrel though!
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Old 10-30-2013, 12:40 PM
Jcordell Jcordell is offline
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Yes the 6.5" bl does somehow seem more period correct with the 1899. It just looks more Victorian Era. You can picture a British officer using it in South Africa during the Boer War for example.
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