imfdb.org  

Go Back   imfdb.org > The Forum > Just Guns

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-22-2013, 02:56 AM
funkychinaman's Avatar
funkychinaman funkychinaman is offline
IMFDB & Forum Admin
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Bucks County, PA
Posts: 2,522
Default Smith & Wesson Model 10-5

I went over to my buddy's place today for Sukkot we started talking about guns. His mom mentioned that she had one tucked under her bed, but didn't know anything about it. She asked me to take a look at it. (I'm kicking myself for not taking a photo with my phone.)

Anyway, as it turns out, it's a Smith & Wesson Model 10-5 snub, serial number D869XXX. She mentioned she bought it from her father years ago for $125, but never actually fired it. It was still wrapped in the S&W wax paper in the original box. The bluing still looks pretty good, but there's a few spots of rust on the hammer and trigger. I did not want to dry fire it, but I did pull back the hammer and let it down slowly, and I could tell it was a bit sticky.

- How much do you think she'd be able to get for it today? I assume the spots of rust probably bring down the value a bit, but is that easily fixable? She was hoping for at least $500, but I didn't know what to tell her.

- She had some handwritten notes in the box which were instructions she had written down when her father handed it over. Most were basic common sense and maintenance, but the one that stuck out to me was an instruction to only carry five rounds and to let the hammer rest on an empty chamber. Now I know that's an old practice from the 19th century that's still practiced in cowboy shooting, but is that necessary for a revolver designed in the mid-20th century?
__________________
"Me fail English? That's unpossible!"
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-22-2013, 07:12 AM
Yournamehere Yournamehere is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 912
Default

The revolvers that seem to sell the most are the snubs, as they are still within a niche that a revolver still fits today (the compact concealed carry niche). That being said, a Model 10-5 is a K frame revolver, it's relatively heavy, and it's blued, so it's definitely no competition for my Model 60 or a current production 642 which will be lighter and more resistant to weather and wear. It'd be a hard sell as a proper defensive gun for any shop.

It's also an older gun with a pinned barrel and recessed cylinder, so it falls into the collector sphere to sell too, but only if it's in really good condition. If the rust isn't bad on the trigger and hammer, and it isn't present anywhere else, you could probably clean it off and bring the gun up to good condition. If the rust looks like just surface stuff, use a brush and some good solvent like Break Free CLP, and if that doesn't work, try some Flitz metal polish and lightly rub it on and off with some patches. If it looks like it's pitted the metal, don't bother. The writing on the box also reduces value to a collector type sale but you still have the original box, so not much. And as for the empty chamber, no, that's ludicrous for a modern double action revolver. That's some old school holdover from SAA days for fudds who can't overcome a training scar.

The real issue is who one sells it too. If you take it to a gun shop to sell, they'll give you half of what it's worth on a good day. So, if they say it's worth 500 dollars, you will get $250. The rest is their profit to make. Honestly though, depending on the condition of the gun with the rust, it'd be a hard sell to the shop at even $400-450, so I'd expect even less. Even though it's a very nice gun, it has a very particular selling niche, and the gun doesn't fit that very well unfortunately. If it's to an individual (I assume you want to buy it from her maybe?). Without seeing the gun's condition, I can't tell you, but with what you've mentioned, I wouldn't pay 500 bucks for it if I were buying it myself. I'd go as high as 600 for a near mint one with the same stuff, and 500 for a near mint gun with the original grips and no box or anything. But a worn gun with a worn box is a tough sell at 500. Conceivable, but not ideal. I'd say $450 give or take, but try for 500 as someone may not care too much, and the rust may not be that bad.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-22-2013, 08:21 AM
funkychinaman's Avatar
funkychinaman funkychinaman is offline
IMFDB & Forum Admin
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Bucks County, PA
Posts: 2,522
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yournamehere View Post
The revolvers that seem to sell the most are the snubs, as they are still within a niche that a revolver still fits today (the compact concealed carry niche). That being said, a Model 10-5 is a K frame revolver, it's relatively heavy, and it's blued, so it's definitely no competition for my Model 60 or a current production 642 which will be lighter and more resistant to weather and wear. It'd be a hard sell as a proper defensive gun for any shop.

It's also an older gun with a pinned barrel and recessed cylinder, so it falls into the collector sphere to sell too, but only if it's in really good condition. If the rust isn't bad on the trigger and hammer, and it isn't present anywhere else, you could probably clean it off and bring the gun up to good condition. If the rust looks like just surface stuff, use a brush and some good solvent like Break Free CLP, and if that doesn't work, try some Flitz metal polish and lightly rub it on and off with some patches. If it looks like it's pitted the metal, don't bother. The writing on the box also reduces value to a collector type sale but you still have the original box, so not much. And as for the empty chamber, no, that's ludicrous for a modern double action revolver. That's some old school holdover from SAA days for fudds who can't overcome a training scar.

The real issue is who one sells it too. If you take it to a gun shop to sell, they'll give you half of what it's worth on a good day. So, if they say it's worth 500 dollars, you will get $250. The rest is their profit to make. Honestly though, depending on the condition of the gun with the rust, it'd be a hard sell to the shop at even $400-450, so I'd expect even less. Even though it's a very nice gun, it has a very particular selling niche, and the gun doesn't fit that very well unfortunately. If it's to an individual (I assume you want to buy it from her maybe?). Without seeing the gun's condition, I can't tell you, but with what you've mentioned, I wouldn't pay 500 bucks for it if I were buying it myself. I'd go as high as 600 for a near mint one with the same stuff, and 500 for a near mint gun with the original grips and no box or anything. But a worn gun with a worn box is a tough sell at 500. Conceivable, but not ideal. I'd say $450 give or take, but try for 500 as someone may not care too much, and the rust may not be that bad.
Yes, it was a bit heavier than I thought it'd be, but I suppose, given what they were buying it for (home defense,) the extra weight could help control recoil with novice shooters.

I didn't think the five round thing was true with modern revolvers. The thing is, since the firing pin is still on the hammer, then what's the difference between that and an SAA, which had the same thing? My Ruger at least has a transfer bar.

It's the original box, the notes are actually on separate pieces of paper. The only writing on the box itself probably came from the factory or the gun shop (which is how I know it's a Model 10-5 instead of just a Model 10.) It's still got the original cleaning kit as well.

I wouldn't call it worn, the rust if probably just from age. I don't think it's been fired in at least thirty years. Her father did shoot, but from what I've heard, the man had quite an arsenal at his disposal. I did think of buying it from them, but the problem is, like you said, it's a bit heavy for carry, and if I had $400 to spend on a gun, I'd spend it on an automatic I can both carry and do action pistol with. I might buy it for $300, but I'd hate to do that to my buddy or his mom.
__________________
"Me fail English? That's unpossible!"
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-22-2013, 05:43 PM
Jcordell Jcordell is offline
Formerly "Checkman"
IMFDB Admin
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Idaho
Posts: 944
Default

The serial number shows that it was manufactured in 75-76. The D prefix serial number was introduced in 1967. It might have been shipped from the factory a little later however. Components are fabricated but then they sometimes sit in storage for a year or two before being assembled and shipped out. You would need a letter from S&W to find out when it was shipped and where to. It's perfectly safe to carry with six rounds in the cylinder. In 1944 S&W made an engineering change. The slide action hammer block places a sliding arm between the hammer face and the frame. It slides out of the way when the hammer is pulled back properly - either single action or double action.

I would also say between $400-$450. The pinned barrel is a plus. The cylinder shouldn't be recessed though. S&W didn't recess the cylinders on the .38 Special revolvers.

For what it's worth I am a revolver guy and I wouldn't mind owning a Model 10 snubbie in decent condition. We are out there. You just have to find us.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-22-2013, 06:37 PM
Yournamehere Yournamehere is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 912
Default

I didn't know they didn't recess the cylinders on .38 only/non-magnum guns, I just thought it was on the J frames where they didn't include it. Thanks for sharing that.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-23-2013, 02:48 AM
funkychinaman's Avatar
funkychinaman funkychinaman is offline
IMFDB & Forum Admin
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Bucks County, PA
Posts: 2,522
Default

Thank you both for the input. I'll pass this info along to her.

Checkman, if you're interested, I can put you in contact with her about a sale.
__________________
"Me fail English? That's unpossible!"
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-23-2013, 03:59 AM
Jcordell Jcordell is offline
Formerly "Checkman"
IMFDB Admin
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Idaho
Posts: 944
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yournamehere View Post
I didn't know they didn't recess the cylinders on .38 only/non-magnum guns, I just thought it was on the J frames where they didn't include it. Thanks for sharing that.
Not a problem. This is from the Page 15 of the 3rd Edition of The Standard Catalog of Smith & Wesson by Jim Supica (now director of the NRA National Firearms museum) and Richard Nahas.

Pinned and Recessed

This refers to Hand Ejectors made prior to 1982. Prior to that time, all Hand ejectors had the barrel fixed to the frame by a pin through the rear of the barrel and the frame and all magnum caliber revolvers had recessed chambers to enclose the rim of the cartridges. Rimfire .22 Long fire cylinders have been counterbored since 1935 and continue so to this day. When the Magnum centerfire caliber recessed cylinder was discontinued the overall length of the cylinder was changed to make up for the difference in rim thickness.

Last edited by Jcordell; 09-23-2013 at 04:54 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-23-2013, 04:02 AM
Jcordell Jcordell is offline
Formerly "Checkman"
IMFDB Admin
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Idaho
Posts: 944
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by funkychinaman View Post
Thank you both for the input. I'll pass this info along to her.

Checkman, if you're interested, I can put you in contact with her about a sale.
I am tapped out right now. Sadly.

I had major surgery in July and our daughter has started college. I am saving up to buy my old department issued Glock 19 and that's going to have to be it for awhile. I purchased a pre-war Colt Official Police in MArch of this year and sadly that is probably going to be the last revolver I buy for awhile. Thanks though. I appreciate it.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.